Essential Guide to the DGA Rate Card 2019

30 September 2019

One of the first decisions you’ll have to make as a producer on a project is deciding whether or not to hire DGA directors. Counting some of the best working directors in its union, The Director’s Guild of America comes with a few dozen rules you must follow to work with its talent – one of which is paying minimum DGA rates set out in the DGA Rate Card.

In this comprehensive guide, we break down the most current DGA rates according to the 2019 DGA Rate Card, so you can determine what you might owe your director on your next project.

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What are DGA rates?

DGA rates are the minimum amounts of money the Directors Guild of America will allow its members to work for on a given project. DGA rates depend on the type of production you’re producing, your schedule, as well as your budget.

Unlike SAG rates, DGA rates are far more than just a set price for a week or day. Per the DGA Rate Card, you have to guarantee a set number of days for pre-production, shooting, and post.

Under most DGA contracts, you pay a lump sump for the entire production process. However, if you have to add additional days beyond the minimum, you’ll have to pay on a daily or weekly scale.

It’s important to note that that you’ll have to pay an additional 17.5% on your DGA payroll for health and benefits, called “fringes.”

Have a preliminary budget ready

Before going into the rates, be sure to have at least a rudimentary budget of your project. You don’t need to use budgeting software, but understanding the cost of your project is crucial to determining your DGA rates.

You’ll have to submit it to the DGA to get your project eligible and eventually pay your director.

You can also use software like Wrapbook, that automatically calculates your DGA rates and fringes for you. By digitally onboarding your director for you, Wrapbook automatically calculates what you’ll have to pay out to stay compliant with the guild – in one, easy to use app.

Plus, it’s free to try out.

Feature films, documentaries, and short films fall under this DGA agreement - DGA Rate Card 2019.
Feature films, documentaries, and short films fall under this DGA agreement - DGA Rate Card 2019.

DGA Theatrical Rates

If you’re producing a film, then look no further than the DGA Theatrical agreement. Here, you can find DGA rates for films across a variety of budgets.

Like SAG rates, the DGA minimums are based on the budget of your project. Due to the immense amount of work directors put into a film, the DGA rates are most commonly expressed on a weekly scale with minimum work committments.

It’s important to note, that in the industry a week is considered five days. If your production goes beyond five days in a week (which does happen), you’ll have to pay your director in accordance with state overtime laws.

Basic Agreement (Greater than $11 MM)

If you’re making a studio flick, then chances are this is where you’ll find your DGA rates. Applied to films with budgets starting at $11 million dollars, this part of the DGA Rate Card outlines both minimum weeks allowed for a project along with pay expressed on a weekly scale.

If you’re making a short or documentary, this is also your contract, regardless of your budget.

Rates effective July 1, 2019 - July 30, 2020 High Budget Shorts & Documentaries
Weekly Salary $20,113 $14,364
Guaranteed Preparation Period 2 Weeks 2 Days
Guaranteed Employment Period 10 Weeks 1 Week + 1 Day
Guaranteed Cutting Allowance 1 Week 0
Compensation for Days Worked Beyond Guarantee $4,023 $2,873
Daily Employment Where Permitted $5,028 $3,591

Low Budget - Level 4C ($8.5 MM - $11 MM)

Once you drop a dollar before 11 million dollars, your project falls becomes a “low budget” DGA production (I know). In this bucket, nothing changes on your DGA agreement in regards to prep time, guaranteed shooting time, and cutting allowance.

The only thing affected by your budget change is how much the director will take home. The weekly salary is 10% less than it would be on the basic DGA theatrical contract, also reflected in the compensation beyond guaranteed work and daily employment rate.

Rates effective July 1, 2019 - July 30, 2020 Budgets Between $8.5MM - $11 MM
Weekly Salary $18,102
Guaranteed Preparation Period 2 Weeks
Guaranteed Employment Period 10 Weeks
Guaranteed Cutting Allowance 1 Week
Compensation for Days Worked Beyond Guarantee 3,620
Daily Employment Where Permitted $4,525

Low Budget - Levels 4A and 4B ($3.75 MM - $8.5 MM)

Like the DGA Rate Card for 2018, the DGA rates for levels 4A and 4B are identical. If your project falls between 3.75 and 8.5 million dollars, you’ll have to pay your directors 25% less than they would make under the basic DGA theatrical contract.

Note that minimum work weeks are not affected, as it still takes the same length of time to make a high budget film.

However, those are just minimum number of weeks set forward. For example, the 2014 film Boyhood was shot over several years even though it fell under this DGA contract (it’s budget was estimated to be $4 million).

Rates effective July 1, 2019 - July 30, 2020 Budgets Between $3.75MM - $8.5 MM
Weekly Salary $15,085
Guaranteed Preparation Period 2 Weeks
Guaranteed Employment Period 10 Weeks
Guaranteed Cutting Allowance 1 Week
Compensation for Days Worked Beyond Guarantee $3,017
Daily Employment Where Permitted $3,771

Low Budget - Level 3 ($2.6 MM - $3.75 MM)

Unlike the DGA Television rates, Level 3 doesn’t set a specific program rate, prep period, or even a DGA rate for work beyond a guaranteed commitment.

Instead, for films with budgets between 2.6 and 3.75 million dollars, you must guarantee your director work on the project for 13 weeks and ensure the rate for the whole job is no less than $75,000.

The minimum 13 weeks of work must also allow for at least 8 weeks for the director to cut the film.

Low Budget - Levels 1 and 2 (Less than $2.6 MM)

If your film’s budget is under 2.6 million dollars, then you’re not looking at a specific DGA rate at all.

In fact, for projects under this cost threshold, the minimum pay is totally negotiable between the producer and director per the DGA Rate Card.

That being said, you’ll still have to pay at least 17.5% in fringes on top of whatever rate you and the director reach. In terms of editing, you must also provide the same number of days for the director to supervise an edit as the director took for principal photography.

If you're producing an existing episode of a TV series, start here - DGA Rate Card 2019.
If you're producing an existing episode of a TV series, start here - DGA Rate Card 2019.

DGA Television Rates

There’s more work than ever in television keeping DGA directors busy. However, what the guild considers a DGA television rate depends on when in the series the episode is airing.

Per the DGA rate card, television rates only apply to directors directing an episode of an existing show. Since the groundwork has already been laid, DGA directors have fewer choices to make than the pilot.

For this reason, the DGA broke directing pilots out into its own category.

So if you’re not producing a pilot, these are your rates.

Network Prime-Time (ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox)

Since networks have been around television the longest, they have their own special rules and regulations. Whether you’re dealing with SAG rates or even crew jobs, the rates for working on a network show are often higher than cable.

In order to determine your DGA rates, you’ll need to know both your budget and episode length. While the DGA Rate Card refers to “dramatic programs,” there isn’t a separate rate card for comedies.

Dramatic, here, simply means a scripted narrative show versus reality.

Rates effective July 1, 2019 - July 30, 2020 1/2 Hour 1 Hour 1 1/2 Hours 2 Hours
Program Rate $27,894 $47,371 $78,953 $132,634
Guaranteed Preparation Period 3 days 7 days 12 days 15 days
Guaranteed Shooting Period 4 days 8 days 13 days 27 days
Compensation for Days Worked Beyond Guarantee $3,985 / day $3,158 / day $3,158 / day $3,158 / day
Daily Employment Where Permitted $4,981 / day $3,948 / day $3,948 / day $3,948 / day

Cable / Non-Network

If you’re not working with Fox, NBC, ABC, or CBS, then your television rates will fall squarely in the cable / non-network camp. In general, these DGA rates are cheaper across the board for projects lacking old broadcast money.

Beyond that, the DGA Rate Card for non-network television shows are very similar. The amount of prep time and guaranteed shooting are nearly the identical. “Dramatic” still means scripted narrative.

Rates effective July 1, 2019 - July 30, 2020 1/2 Hour Dramatic Programs in first season or budgeted at $550,000 or more but less than $1,525,000 1/2 Hour Dramatic Programs in 2nd or subsequent season and budgeted at $1,525,000 or more but less than $2,000,000 1/2 Hour Dramatic Program in 2nd or subsequent season with budgets at $2,000,000 or more 1 Hour Dramatic Programs budgeted at $1,200,000 or more but less than $2,800,000 1 Hour Dramatic Programs in its FIRST SEASON and budgeted at $2,800,000 or more 1 Hour Dramatic Programs in its 2nd or subsequent season and budgeted at $2,800,000 or more 1-1/2 Hour Dramatic Programs with Budgets of $2,750,000 or More 2 Hour Dramatic Programs with Budgets of $2,750,000 for the first 2 hours plus $1,375,000 for each additional hour or portion thereof
Program Rate $12,411 $15,655 $18,275 $24,812 $25,539 $35,484 $37,230 $88,969
Guaranteed Preparation Period 3 days 3 days 3 days 6 days 6 days 7 days 9 days 15 days
Guaranteed Shooting Period 3 days 4 days 4 days 6 days 6 days 7 days 9 days 27 days
Compensation for Days Worked Beyond Guarantee $2,068 / day $2,236 / day $2,611 / day $2,068 / day $2,128 / day $2,535 / day $2,068 / day $2,118 / day
Daily Employment Where Permitted $2,586 / day $2,796 / day $3,263 / day $2,585 / day $2,660 / day $3,168 / day $2,585 / day $2,648 / day

In the eyes of the DGA, pilots get special treatment - DGA Rate Card 2019.
In the eyes of the DGA, pilots get special treatment - DGA Rate Card 2019.

DGA Pilot Rates

Making a television pilot is an extremely laborious process. Since it’s the first episode, directors will have to make 10 times the number of decisions they would have to on a preexisting show.

It’s part of the reason why directors get executive producer credit on shows when they direct the pilot.

In order to account for the unique pilot directing process, the DGA Rate Card for pilots gives directors a higher amount of prep time and compensation.

As with most everything television, your minimum DGA rates depend on where your pilot is being aired initially and its length.

Network (NBC, ABC, CBS, Fox)

As with most DGA rates, network rates are always higher than cable. For network pilots, DGA directors must receive a flat rate for their efforts, increasing with program length.

Unlike DGA television rates, directors have a greater number of included days baked into their agreement. Additional days cost a few thousand dollars more as well.

Rates effective July 1, 2019 - July 30, 2020 1/2 Hour 1 Hour 1 1/2 Hours 2 Hours
Program Rate $78,953 $105,267 $131,573 $184,214
Included Days 14 days 24 days 34 days 50 days
Compensation for Days Worked Beyond Guarantee $5,639 / day $4,386 / day $3,870 / day $3,684 / day
Daily Employment Where Permitted $7,049 / day $5,483 / day $4,837 / day $4,605 / day

Cable / Non-Network

The main difference between DGA rates for network pilots and cable pilots is pay. Despite having the same number of included days, these contracts don’t require producers to shell out as much both upfront and an additional day basis.

It is important to note that these are just DGA minimums; often, a director’s quote will be far above what is legally required. People like David Fincher aren’t working with Netflix for nothing.

Rates effective July 1, 2019 - July 30, 2020 1/2 Hour Dramatic Programs (Basic Cable with Budgets of $550,000 or more) 1 Hour Dramatic Programs (Basic Cable with Budgets of $1,200,000 or more) 1-1/2 Hour Dramatic Programs (Basic Cable with Budgets of $2,750,000 or more) 2 Hour Dramatic Programs (Basic Cable with Budgets of $2,750,000 or more)
Program Rate $47,372 $63,160 $78,944 $110,528
Included Days 14 days 24 days 34 days 50 days
Compensation for Days Worked Beyond Guarantee $3,384 / day $2,632 / day $2,322 / day $2,211 / day
Daily Employment Where Permitted $4,230 / day $3,290 / day $2,902 / day $2,763 / day

DGA Commercial Rates

Some commercials are shot over several weeks. Others are shot in a few hours.

When it comes to DGA commercials, the DGA Rate Card is simple and easy to understand. Regardless of the commercial’s scale, the DGA commercial rates must be at least $1,490 for the day or $5,959 for a 5-day week.

As with all DGA rates, you should expect to pay an additional 17.5% into the DGA health and pension plan. That means instead of paying $1000 for the day you’ll have to pay an additional fee ($175) on top of that.

Rates effective Dec 1, 2018 - Nov 30, 2019 Daily Weekly
DGA Director Rate $1,490 $5,959

Wrapping Up

Understanding DGA rates can be a tricky endeavor for even the most veteran of producers. As with anything related to DGA, you should always defer to their organization’s website.

What lingering questions about the 2019 DGA Rate Card do you have? Hit us up at success@wrapbook.com.

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